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Updated: 11 min 11 sec ago

‘Hamilton’ tickets go on sale Monday morning

49 min 36 sec ago

DENVER — Several people lined up Monday morning for their chance to grab tickets to smash musical “Hamilton” that will be performed in Denver later this year.

There was a long line outside the Denver Center for the Performing Arts box office in the lobby of the Helen Bonfils Theatre Complex ahead of sales that begin at 10 a.m.

The Tony Award-winning show will be at the Buell Theatre from Feb. 27 to April 1.

The DCPA is taking new steps to make sure people buying tickets online for “Hamilton” are those who actually plan to attend the show.

The DCPA said it is using new technology to stop third-party ticket brokers from scooping up and reselling them at inflated prices.

Tickets will not be sold to anyone trying to use the same credit card on different computers.

The DCPA said after the tickets are sold out, it will examine each sale and any purchases that appear to have been bought by a so-called bot will be canceled.

People looking to buy tickets online will be greeted by a new virtual waiting room.

People can log on starting at 9 a.m. Monday. Those buyers in the virtual waiting room at 10 a.m. will be assigned a random place in line.

They can then elect to get an email when it’s their turn to buy. They’ll have 15 minutes to finish the transaction.

Those who log on after 10 a.m. will be assigned a place in line behind those who were in the virtual waiting room.

Tickets can also be bought by phone 303-893-4100 or at the DCPA box office.

 

How Meal Planning Saves Money

1 hour 13 min ago

Consumer savings expert Eva Fry from uGrocery shows us how meal planning saves money.

Meal Planning Saves money because it reduces the number of trips to the store, you plan your meals for the week and shop once for everything you need.    How to Meal Plan:
  1. Shop your pantry, refrigerator and freezer and make a mental note of what you have on hand for meal prep
  2. Plan your meals around the sale items at the grocery store – not everything can make a meal, so focus on meat and produce deals to make a meal
  3. Use the free uGrocery app to see the best deals on meat, seafood and produce and compare prices to determine the store you plan to shop
  4. Know how many meals you need to prepare and how much food you need to buy.  If you are planning just for dinners – then you need to know how many nights you plan to cook, eat left overs, go out to dinner, etc.
  5. Write down the meals as well as any additional grocery items or ingredients you need to prepare the meals.  I’ll show my meal plan calendar live on camera.
  6. This way you are only buying what you need for your meals, plus stocking up on great deals that you will use for future meals and you don’t have this looming question of what’s for dinner every night.
  7. Re-use the main meat across multiple meals when possible.  For example – beef roast is on sale for $2.77/lb this week.  To me, that means French Dip Sandwiches, beef carnitas and pot roast pizza in one week.  I cook  the roast on a Sunday in the crock pot for French Dip, store left overs and add spices for carnitas on Tuesday and whatever is left over on Thursday gets turned into a pot roast pizza.  You can do the same with chicken.  Grill, roast or crock pot it on Sunday for a meal, use again Tuesday for soup and Wednesday for enchiladas or fajitas.  You just need to buy enough to cook once to last throughout the week.

Live updates: Slick roads, several delayed openings on day after largest storm of season

2 hours 24 min ago

DENVER — Several roads across the Denver metro area were iced over on Monday, one day after the largest snowstorm of the season hit the area.

Several schools reported closures and delayed openings because of the conditions.

Minimal power outages were reported and there were only about a dozen flight cancellations and delays at Denver International Airport.

Follow live updates through the morning commute. (The page will automatically update; there is no need to refresh the page.)

Storm resources
Full forecast
Closures and delays
Traffic conditions
Storm photos
Snow forecast
Watches and warnings
CDOT travel alerts
Interactive radar
CDOT snowplow locator
Denver International Airport arrivals and departures
Xcel Energy outage map

Sunshine returns ahead of fast-moving storm system overnight in mountains

2 hours 31 min ago

DENVER -- The snow is done in Denver, Boulder, Fort Collins and the mountains as the largest snowstorm of the season has moved out.

There will be sunshine and highs around 39 on Monday, with teens in the mountains.

It will be windy above treeline, the foothills and across the west side of the Denver metro area. There will be gusts to 40-45 mph with some blowing and drifting snow.

The eastern Plains continue to have snow and wind on Monday morning, but there will be improving conditions by noon.

Snow forecast tonight into Tuesday morning. Meteorologist Chris Tomer.

A fast-moving cold front hits the central and northern mountains on Monday night into Tuesday morning with wind and 1-2 inches of snow for Loveland, Winter Park and Steamboat Springs.

The Front Range can expect partly cloudy skies on Tuesday with highs in the mid-30s.

The warm before the storm occurs on Thursday with a high of 56 that will be accompanied by wave cloudiness.

There's a 10 percent chance of snow showers on Friday with highs around 38. The mountains can expect snow.

There will be sunny skies on Saturday and Sunday with highs around 35 on Saturday and 50 on Sunday.

Check interactive radar and zoom in to where you are. Plus, check the radar anytime with the Pinpoint Weather App for iPhone and Android.

Pinpoint Weather Meteorologists Dave Fraser, Greg Dutra, Jessica Lebel, Matt Makens, and Chris Tomer.

Pinpoint Weather has been independently certified as Colorado's Most Accurate Forecast by WeatheRate.

We're tracking weather today on FOX31 Denver and Channel 2 News -- and when conditions are bad we send out the Weather Beast.

Closings and delays: Full list of weather closures

3 hours 56 min ago

DENVER — All active Denver and metro area snow closures and delays for schools, businesses, churches and government offices.

Click for the full list.

Elderly man missing from Fort Collins home

9 hours 33 min ago

LARIMER COUNTY, Colo. — An 83-year-old man was reported missing out of Fort Collins on Sunday, the Larimer County Sheriff’s Office said.

John Sprackling was last seen about noon Saturday from the 2000 block of Sherell Drive in Fort Collins.


Sprackling is 5-foot-9 and 160 pounds. He has gray hair and blue eyes. He recently had been wearing blue sweatpants and slip-on shoes.

A neighbor reported that Sprackling was seen driving away from his home in a red or maroon 1998 Mercury Mountaineer with Colorado license plates 165-LOS.

The vehicle has a white Longs Pond Association sticker on the rear window and possibly a Crystal Lake sticker in the same area.

There is also a small dent on the driver’s side of the rear bumper.

Family members reported it is not like Sprackling to leave his home or family for more than a couple of hours, and he does not have any known medical conditions that would contribute to his absence.

His cellphone was left at his home.

Deputies have checked Sprackling’s cabin in Red Feather Lakes and have contacted law enforcement in Wisconsin where he also owns property.

The criteria have not been met to issue a Silver Alert, but anyone with information regarding his whereabouts is asked to call the sheriff’s office at 970-416-1985 or local law enforcement.

Winter storm means fun for cold weather fans in Denver

9 hours 41 min ago

DENVER -- This weekend's storm brought the most snow Denver has seen all season, with almost every part of the metro area getting a couple of inches.

And for some, that meant the fun was ready to begin.

Cowboy comedian keeps show rolling

9 hours 50 min ago

DENVER -- There is no question some of the toughest athletes are cowboys who choose to strap themselves to a 1,500-pound bull and hang on or wrestle a steer to the ground.

But what happens when that dreams ends? The cowboy who started clowning around spends his time helping the bullfighters, but more importantly, maintains the laughter in the arena.

National Western Stock Show wraps up with near record attendance

9 hours 50 min ago

DENVER — As snow pounded the Denver metro area on Sunday, thousands traded in their snow boots for cowboy boots, filing into the National Western Stock Show.

Organizers say more than 700,000 people visited the show over 16 days.

“We couldn’t be more excited,” stock show president Paul Andrews said. “For only the second time in our history, we’re going over 700,000 attendees. This will end the second-highest of all time once we shake the numbers out.”

Last year’s show saw about 685,000 visitors.

Sunday’s snow didn’t scare thousands from taking advantage of guest appreciation day.

“We’re from Colorado so you learn how to take your time in it and drive and be safe,” Mike Hanson said. “It wasn’t going to stop us from coming today, that’s for sure.”

Organizers will spend the next few months planning for next year. One major change for 2019 will be more parking.

“We’re rebuilding the National Western Center project, so next year you’re going to have a whole lot more parking,” Andrews said. “We’re going to have a lot of the buildings torn down around us, so you’ll be able to park in those areas next year so people will have an even better experience.”

Backcountry skier dies in avalanche near Silverton

Sun, 01/21/2018 - 23:56

SILVERTON, Colo. — Colorado experienced its first avalanche fatality of the 2018 season on Sunday.

A backcountry skier was killed in an area locally know as Sam’s Trees, between Red Mountain Pass and Silverton, according to San Miguel Search and Rescue.

The Northern San Juan Mountains have seen up to 20 inches of new snow in a 24-hour period.

The current danger rating is considerable at Level 3 and visitors should remain vigilant while traveling in the backcountry.

Natural avalanches are possible, while human triggered avalanches are likely, according to Search and Rescue.

The victim has not been identified and officials have not offered specifics regarding the incident.

Calls for change in Hollywood at the SAG Awards

Sun, 01/21/2018 - 23:01
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LOS ANGELES — There were more calls for change by women in Hollywood at the 24th Screen Actors Guild Awards on Sunday.

The awards ceremony began as it traditionally does, with actors discussing how they became actors.

But this year there was a twist — only women spoke.

It was further evidence that #MeToo and Time’s Up movements will remain a central focus of Hollywood’s award season.

Women took center stage at the ceremony with the SAG Awards featuring its first-ever host, Kristen Bell and all-female presenters.

SAG-AFTRA president Gabrielle Carteris hailed the men and women of who are members of the guild as being “agents of change.”

“Truth is power and women are stepping into their power,” she said. “Make no mistake, this is not a moment is time, this is a movement.”

Actress Rosanna Arquette, who accused producer Harvey Weinstein of sexual harassment, was honored by Marisa Tomei for breaking her silence in October as the pair presented the award for outstanding performance by a female actor in a television movie or miniseries.

Arquette got choked up as she called out the names of others who have come forward with accusations against men of power, including Ashley Judd and Asia Argento.

The award went to Nicole Kidman for her performance in “Big Little Lies.”

She paid tribute to co-nominees Jessica Lange and Susan Sarandon, along with Meryl Streep and others, for proving that women older than 40 have a place in the industry.

“Twenty years ago we were pretty washed up by this stage in our lives, that’s not the case now,” Kidman said. “We’ve proven — and these actresses and so many more are proving — that we are potent and powerful and viable. I just beg that the industry stays behind us because our stories are finally being told.”

Bell kicked off the night with a light approach, joking that she was the “first lady” of the event.

“I think my first initiative as first lady will be cyberbullying, as I have yet to see any progress on that,” Bell joked.

She also touched on current events, including a joke that the dystopian drama “The Handmaids Tale” was a documentary.

But Bell quickly got more serious.

“Everyone’s story deserves to be told,” she said, referring to people coming forward with experiences of being abused.

“We are living in a watershed moment,” Bell said. “And as we march forward with active momentum and open ears, let’s make sure that we’re leading the charge with empathy and diligence because fear and anger never win the race.”

The first award of the night for outstanding performance by a male actor in a comedy went to William H. Macy for “Shameless,” his third for that role and his fourth career win.

Julia Louis-Dreyfus also won for her role on “Veep,” but the actress was not present to receive the award.

Her “Veep” castmates acknowledged Louis-Dreyfus moments later, when they won for best ensemble performance by a cast in a television comedy.

“This Is Us” star Sterling K. Brown continued his winning streak with the award for outstanding performance by a male actor in a drama series.

Brown had some advice for up-and-coming actors.

“The fame won’t sustain you. The money won’t sustain you,” he said. “The love. Keep that love alive.”

“This Is Us” also took home the statue for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a drama series, a first for the cast.

Sam Rockwell won his first award, clenching the outstanding male actor in a supporting role for “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.”

He thanked the film’s star, Frances McDormand, whom he called a “powerhouse” and gave a nod to the momentum of the women’s movement in Hollywood.

“I’m in awe of [McDormand] and I stand shoulder to shoulder with you and all the incredible women in this room for trying to make things better,” Rockwell said. “It’s long overdue.”

McDormand won for outstanding female actor.

The cast also took home the award for outstanding performance by a cast in a theatrical motion picture.

Brie Larson and Lupita Nyong’o, who presented the award, announced a new code of conduct will be instituted on sets to keep actors safe.

Allison Janney took home her seventh career award with her outstanding performance by a female actor in a supporting role for the film “I, Tonya.”

Rita Moreno was visibly moved when she received a standing ovation as she took the stage to present Morgan Freeman with a lifetime achievement award.

“This is beyond honor, this is a place in history,” Freeman said.

He also got in on the mood of the night.

“I’m going to tell you what’s wrong with this statue,” Freeman quipped. “It works from the back. From the front it’s gender specific. Maybe I started something?”

Shutdown continues into workweek as Senate talks drag on

Sun, 01/21/2018 - 21:51
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WASHINGTON — The government shutdown will extend into the workweek as the Senate appeared to inch closer to ending a partisan stalemate late Sunday but fell short of agreement.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and his Democratic leader Chuck Schumer said negotiations were still underway into the night, with a vote to break a Democratic filibuster on a short-term funding bill scheduled for noon Monday.

Seeking to win over holdout votes, McConnell pledged Sunday that the Senate would take up legislation on some top Democratic priorities, including immigration, if they aren’t already addressed by Feb. 8.

“We have yet to reach an agreement on a path forward,” Schumer said, adding that talks would continue.

McConnell’s commitment follows hours of behind-the-scenes talks between the leaders and rank-and-file lawmakers over how to end the two-day display of legislative dysfunction.

The Senate adjourned without voting Sunday, guaranteeing the shutdown would continue into a third day.

Republicans have appeared increasingly confident that Democrats were bearing the brunt of criticism for the shutdown and that they would ultimately buckle.

The White House and GOP leaders said they would not negotiate with Democrats on immigration until the government is reopened.

There were indications Sunday that Democratic resolve was beginning to waver, with growing worries that a prolonged shutdown could prove to be an electoral headache for the party just as they have grown confident about their prospects in November.

Discussions took place in behind closed doors throughout the day with few outward signs of progress, as lawmakers took turns delivering animated speeches to near empty chambers to explain why the other party is to blame.

Senate Majority Leader McConnell and Democratic leader Chuck Schumer met off the Senate floor in the early evening, as many in quiet Capitol offices flipped their television screens to playoff football games.

As lawmakers feuded, signs of the shutdown were evident at national parks and in some federal agencies.

Social Security and most other safety-net programs were unaffected by the lapse in federal spending authority.

Critical government functions continued, with uniformed service members, health inspectors and law enforcement officers set to work without pay.

Lawmakers were mindful that the political stakes would soar Monday morning, when thousands of federal workers would be told to stay home or, in many cases, work without pay.

What was still a weekend burst of Washington dysfunction could spiral into a broader crisis with political consequences in November’s midterm elections.

That threat prompted a bipartisan group of Senate moderates to huddle for a second day Sunday in hopes of crafting a plan to reopen the government.

The contours of that proposal were still taking shape Sunday evening. In exchange for Democratic votes on a three-week spending measure, the GOP leadership in the Senate would agree to address immigration policy and other pressing legislative matters in the coming weeks.

Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del., said the potential deal would not secure an immediate vote on immigration tied to reopening the government, but lawmakers were seeking “an agreement that we would proceed to immigration.”

The approach found advocates in South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham, who has been trying to broker an immigration deal, and Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, both Republicans who rejected an earlier short-term proposal.

Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake, another previous no vote, announced he would vote in favor of reopening the government Monday.

Shortly before 7 p.m., Graham said no deal had been reached by the moderate group because Democrats were not yet on board.

“To my Democratic friends, don’t overplay your hand,” he told reporters. “A government shutdown is not a good way to get an outcome legislatively.”

Schumer indicated earlier Sunday that he would continue to lead a filibuster of the stopgap spending measure, while congressional Republicans appeared content to let the pressure build on the second day of the government shutdown.

After Senate Democrats blocked a temporary government-wide funding bill Friday night, both parties engaged in furious finger-pointing.

Democrats, who initially dug in on a demand for legislation to protect about 700,000 immigrants who were brought illegally to the country as children, shifted to blame the shutdown on the incompetence of President Donald Trump and the Republican leadership.

Republicans argued that Democrats shuttered the government over “illegal immigration” in a bid to gin up enthusiasm among their base.

“I think they miscalculated on the shutdown,” Sen. John Cornyn said. “It’s very unpopular and they’re trying to find a way out of it.”

Absent a breakthrough, the vote Monday will prove to be a test of unity and resolve among Democrats.

Five Democrats from states won by Trump broke ranks in a vote Friday. The measure gained 50 votes to proceed to 49 against, but 60 were needed to break a Democratic filibuster.

Trump, who regularly disrupted negotiations in recent weeks, had been a relatively subdued player in the weekend debate.

He has not appeared in public since Friday afternoon. The White House said he was in regular contact with Republican leaders, but he has not reached out to any Democrats, a White House official said.

Sunday morning on Twitter, he called on the GOP-controlled Senate to consider deploying the “nuclear option” — changing Senate rules to end the filibuster — and reopen the government with a simple majority.

McConnell has dismissed that option, saying Republicans will welcome the filibuster when they return to being the Senate minority.

Democrats are facing intense pressure from their base to solve the issue over the young immigrants, and they are skeptical of Republicans’ credibility when offering to deal.

Whether Trump would back the emerging plan or any later proposal on immigration is an open question. Even if the Senate voted on an immigration proposal, its prospects in the House would be grim.

Furthermore, Democrats view Trump as an infuriating bargaining partner, pointing chiefly to his failed 11th-hour talks with Schumer on Friday.

The Democrat says Trump expressed support for a fix for the young immigrants in return for financing for Trump’s wall along the U.S.-Mexico border — only to back off hours later.

The White House said Schumer and the president never came to terms.

“How can you negotiate with the president under those circumstances where he agrees face to face to move forward with a certain path and then within two hours calls back and pulls the plug?” asked Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., on ABC’s “This Week” on Sunday.

Denver Public Schools, others delayed or closed on Monday

Sun, 01/21/2018 - 21:20

DENVER — Denver Public Schools is one of a handful of districts and organizations that got a jump on announcing delays and closures ahead of the Monday morning commute.

The DPS delay will only affect certain schools.

DPS will implement a one-hour delay Monday for all schools starting at 8:30 a.m. All other DPS schools are operating on normal schedules.

Adams County District 12, Cherry Creek School District and Colorado Early Colleges are among the schools that have posted a delay or closure.

RELATED: School closures and delays

Several schools have delays for older students while preschool and kindergarten at those same schools have been canceled. Be sure to check carefully.

US hockey GM dies unexpectedly at Colorado Springs home

Sun, 01/21/2018 - 20:52

Longtime USA Hockey executive and U.S. Olympic men’s hockey general manager Jim Johannson died unexpectedly Sunday at age 53, shocking the sport less than three weeks before the start of the Pyeongchang Games.

Johannson died in his sleep at his home in Colorado Springs, according to USA Hockey. His death came in the midst of the most high-profile role in his career: putting together the U.S. men’s Olympic hockey team without NHL players going to South Korea, a position he relished after doing so at several world junior and world championships.

“He had a couple of the greatest days of his life at USA Hockey recently to be able to call all these guys that never thought in their lives they’d play on a U.S. Olympic hockey team, and he got to tell them that they realized a dream,” USA Hockey execute director Pat Kelleher said by phone. “I think that meant as much to Jimmy as it did to any of the players.”

With the NHL out of the Olympics for the first time since 1994, Johannson was excited about putting together a 25-man roster that would include “25 great stories.” He picked Tony Granato as coach and on Jan. 1 unveiled a diverse roster made up of players from European professional leagues, the American Hockey League and the NCAA.

Johannson was proud of the unheralded roster, one that will now try to capture a gold medal for him.

“I think it would be huge,” former USA Hockey executive director Dave Ogrean said by phone. “If we ever had a ‘Win one for the Gipper’ moment, this is it.”

It’s unclear who would be in charge of choosing any potential injury replacements if needed. The U.S. opens the Olympics Feb. 14 against Slovenia.

The talent pool now and in other tournaments is deeper in part because of Johannson, who has overseen the growth of hockey in the U.S. beyond the “Miracle On Ice” in 1980. Retired American-born forward Jeremy Roenick said, “USA hockey is a world power now because of people like Jimmy Johannson.”

The U.S. won 64 medals, including 34 gold, in major international competition during Johannson’s tenure. The Americans in particular became a perennial threat to win the world junior championship, showing the program’s improvement at the youth levels.

Carolina Hurricanes president Don Waddell said Johannson “has been a driving force in making both the USA Hockey men’s and women’s programs into consistent winners, and 2015 gold-medal-winning world junior coach Phil Housley said Johannson “grew our game to new heights.”

“In building the teams that achieved so much success for USA Hockey, Jim Johannson had a sharp eye for talent, a strong sense of chemistry and a relentless pursuit of excellence,” NHL commissioner Gary Bettman said. “As we mourn his loss, we will remember the positive outlook Jim brought to his tireless efforts to advance USA Hockey.”

Johannson, who played for the U.S. at the 1988 and 1992 Olympics, began working for USA Hockey in 2000 after spending five years as the general manager of the Twin Cities Vulcans in the United States Hockey League. He was promoted to assistant executive director of hockey operations in 2007, overseeing the organization’s efforts in fielding teams for international competition.

He played college hockey at Wisconsin and helped the Badgers win the NCAA championship as a freshman. He was selected by Hartford in the seventh round of the 1982 draft and although he never played in the NHL, he was respected and well-liked by those all over hockey.

“We lost a true friend in Jim Johannson today,” Granato said. “He was so compassionate and as loyal a friend as you could have. He was the ultimate teammate. I am deeply saddened and shocked and sorry that he is no longer with us. He was a special human being. Please pray for Jim’s wife and daughter, Abby and Ellie.”

Kelleher said USA Hockey would think about ways to pay tribute to Johannson at the Pyeongchang Games after grieving this loss.

“Today it’s really just trying to help his family as best as we can and really just try and honestly put one foot in front of the other,” Kelleher said. “We’ll have to see what we can do to try and honor him in some fashion.”

No deal reached as moderates search for shutdown solution

Sun, 01/21/2018 - 20:42

WASHINGTON — Restive Senate moderates in both parties searched for a solution to a partisan stalemate as they raced toward a late-night showdown vote and their last chance to reopen the federal government before hundreds of thousands of federal workers were forced to stay home Monday.

Lawmakers on Capitol Hill said they were pursuing a deal to end the rare closure, prompted Friday by a messy tussle over immigration and spending.

There were no indications that a firm agreement had been reached, or that leaders of either party or the White House were on board. A stopgap spending measure was slated for a vote on Monday after midnight, but Democrats have so far refused to go along with the temporary fix.

Republicans have appeared increasingly confident that Democrats were bearing the brunt of criticism for the shutdown and that they would ultimately buckle. The White House and GOP leadership said they would not negotiate with Democrats on immigration until the government is reopened.

There were indications Sunday that Democratic resolve was beginning to waver, with growing worries that a prolonged shutdown could prove to be an electoral headache for the party just as they have grown confident about their prospects in November.

The Senate’s No. 2 Republican, Sen. John Cornyn of Texas, indicated that Republican leaders were skeptical that Democrats would budge. Asked whether he thought the government would be closed Monday, he said, “Right now, yes, I do.”

The discussions took place in behind closed doors with few outward signs of progress, as lawmakers took turns delivering animated speeches to near empty chambers to explain why the other party is to blame.

Senate Majority Leader McConnell and Democratic leader Chuck Schumer met off the Senate floor in the early evening, as many in quiet Capitol offices flipped their television screens to playoff football games.

As lawmakers feuded, signs of the shutdown were evident at national parks and in some federal agencies. Social Security and most other safety-net programs were unaffected by the lapse in federal spending authority.

Critical government functions continued, with uniformed service members, health inspectors and law enforcement officers set to work without pay.

Lawmakers were mindful that the political stakes would soar Monday morning, when thousands of federal workers would be told to stay home or, in some cases, work without pay. What was still a weekend burst of Washington dysfunction could spiral into a broader crisis with political consequences in November’s midterm elections.

That threat prompted moderates to huddle for a second day Sunday in hopes of crafting a plan to reopen the government. The contours of that proposal were still taking shape Sunday evening.

In exchange for Democratic votes on a three-week spending measure, the GOP leadership in the Senate would agree to address immigration policy and other pressing legislative matters in the coming weeks.

Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del., said the potential deal would not secure an immediate vote on immigration tied to reopening the government, but lawmakers were seeking “an agreement that we would proceed to immigration.”

The approach found advocates in South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham, who has been trying to broker an immigration deal, and Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, both Republicans who rejected an earlier short-term proposal. Lawmakers took the proposal to their leaders Sunday afternoon.

But shortly before 7 p.m. Sunday, Graham said no deal had been reached by the moderate group because Democrats were not on board. “To my Democratic friends, don’t overplay your hand,” he told reporters. “A government shutdown is not a good way to get an outcome legislatively.”

Chuck Schumer, the Senate’s top Democrat, indicated earlier Sunday that he would continue to lead a filibuster of the stopgap spending measure, while congressional Republicans appeared content to let the pressure build on the second day of the government shutdown. After Senate Democrats blocked a temporary government-wide funding bill Friday night, both parties engaged in furious finger-pointing.

Democrats, who initially dug in on a demand for legislation to protect about 700,000 immigrants who were brought illegally to the country as children, shifted to blame the shutdown on the incompetence of President Donald Trump and the Republican leadership.

Republicans argued that Democrats shuttered the government over “illegal immigration” in a bid to gin up enthusiasm among their base.

“I think they miscalculated on the shutdown,” Cornyn said. “It’s very unpopular and they’re trying to find a way out of it.”

Absent a breakthrough, the vote early Monday will prove to be a test of unity and resolve among Democrats. Five Democrats from states won by Trump broke ranks in a vote Friday. The measure gained 50 votes to proceed to 49 against, but 60 were needed to break a Democratic filibuster.

Trump, who regularly disrupted negotiations in recent weeks, had been a relatively subdued player in the weekend debate. He has not appeared in public since Friday afternoon. The White House said he was in regular contact with Republican leaders, but he has not reached out to any Democrats, a White House official said.

Sunday morning on Twitter, he called on the GOP-controlled Senate to consider deploying the “nuclear option” — changing Senate rules to end the filibuster — and reopen the government with a simple majority.

McConnell has dismissed that option, saying Republicans will welcome the filibuster when they return to being the Senate minority.

Democrats are facing intense pressure from their base to solve the issue over the young immigrants, and they are skeptical of Republicans’ credibility when offering to deal. Whether Trump would back the emerging plan or any later proposal on immigration is an open question. Even if the Senate voted on an immigration proposal, its prospects in the House would be grim.

Furthermore, Democrats view Trump as an infuriating bargaining partner, pointing chiefly to his failed 11th-hour talks with Schumer on Friday.

The Democrat says Trump expressed support for a fix for the young immigrants in return for financing for Trump’s wall along the U.S.-Mexico border — only to back off hours later. The White House says Schumer and the president never came to terms.

“How can you negotiate with the president under those circumstances where he agrees face to face to move forward with a certain path and then within two hours calls back and pulls the plug?” asked Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., on ABC’s “This Week” on Sunday.

Snow moves out overnight, leaving behind icy roads for Monday morning

Sun, 01/21/2018 - 18:15

DENVER -- Snow is ending on the Interstate 25 corridor on Sunday but is still falling on the eastern Plains.

The storm has brought the highest snowfall totals Denver has seen so far this season and has created tough travel conditions across the state.

The Denver metro area saw snowfall totals ranging from 3 inches on the low end to 9 inches on the west side close to the foothills.

Snow showers will taper off from west to east. They will end in Denver and the I-25 corridor between 9 p.m. and midnight.

The central and eastern mountains will see a few isolated showers overnight but will clear out Monday morning.

The eastern Plains will be the last to see the snow clear but will be dry by 6 a.m. Monday.

The eastern Plains are under a blizzard warning until midnight. Winds will be gusting up to 50 mph and will cause blowing snow reducing visibility to less than a quarter of a mile at times.

These are extremely dangerous conditions to travel in. The eastern Plains could see up to 3 inches of additional accumulation tonight under heavier bands of snow.

Colorado will be clear of snow showers by the Monday morning commute but will be left with icy roads and cold temperatures.

Temperatures will fall into the teens overnight, raising concern for freezing of wet snow on roadways.

Any roads that are icy and snow packed Sunday will most likely stay that way Monday morning.

Monday afternoon will be dry and mostly sunny with highs in the mid to upper 30s. This will help start the melting process on some of the roadways.

Temperatures will stay in the 30s and 40s the rest of the week in Denver with a slight chance for some flurries returning on Friday.

Check interactive radar and zoom in to where you are. Plus, check the radar anytime with the Pinpoint Weather App for iPhone and Android.

Pinpoint Weather Meteorologists Dave Fraser, Greg Dutra, Jessica Lebel, Matt Makens, and Chris Tomer.

Pinpoint Weather has been independently certified as Colorado's Most Accurate Forecast by WeatheRate.

We're tracking weather today on FOX31 Denver and Channel 2 News -- and when conditions are bad we send out the Weather Beast.

Blizzard conditions, crashes cause closures on I-70, U.S. 36

Sun, 01/21/2018 - 17:08

DENVER — Snow and ice caused multiple crashes and shut down a part of Interstate 70 on Sunday afternoon, the Colorado Department of Transportation said.

The adverse conditions closed the interstate in both directions between Aurora to Burlington near the Kansas state line.

The first closure shut down occurred between Limon and Burlington before it was extended.

I-70 closed both directions Limon to Burlington b/c adverse conditions,multiple crashes

— CDOT (@ColoradoDOT) January 21, 2018

A crash on I-70 just east of Pena Boulevard had traffic at a near standstill in the early evening.

Collision impacting EB I-70 traffic just east of Pena. pic.twitter.com/Uv8gFH8SBG

— Michael Konopasek (@MikeKonopasek) January 22, 2018

CDOT reported blizzard conditions in northeastern Colorado.

Snow combined with gusty north winds to 45 mph caused areas of blowing and drifting snow, making travel extremely dangerous.

U.S. 36 was also also closed from Last Chance to Idalia, CDOT said.

Watch: Firefighters perform ice rescue to haul deer out of Lakewood reservoir

Sun, 01/21/2018 - 16:53

LAKEWOOD, Colo. — The weekend storm kept firefighters at West Metro Fire Rescue busy on Sunday.

A post on the department’s Facebook page shows a deer who had to be rescued from an icy reservoir. According to the post, a dive team was deployed to the Main Reservoir in Lakewood after they received a call of an animal in distress.

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Lakewood Animal Control contacted the department when a deer was spotted standing in the water, unable or too tired to move.

The dive team had to break a path through the ice and then were able to grab one of the animal’s antlers and guide it back to land. Once on shore, the deer was warmed up in the Lakewood Police Department’s animal control van.

The pictures depict a sad story with a happy ending as the deer is last seen in the van wrapped up in a blanket.

Jefferson County sheriff’s deputy involved in head-on crash

Sun, 01/21/2018 - 14:31

JEFFERSON COUNTY, Colo. — Two parties were taken to a hospital after a head-on collision involving a Jefferson County sheriff’s deputy on Sunday.

The Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office said the deputy and a civilian were involved in the crash just after 11 a.m. on northbound U.S. 285 near Elk Creek Road.

Alternate routes and long delays were reported in the area.

Traffic alternating NB US 285 @ Pine Junction MM 229;Long delays

— CDOT (@ColoradoDOT) January 21, 2018

The Colorado State Patrol is investigating the crash.

Snowfall totals from Jan. 21 storm

Sun, 01/21/2018 - 10:46

DENVER — A cold front brought much-needed snow to the Front Range on Sunday.

It’s expected to be the most snowfall recorded at Denver International Airport, the official recording station for the National Weather Service, since Dec. 16, 2016.

Totals storm varied as reported by the National Weather Service and its trained weather spotters.

Final totals

  • Arvada: 8.5 inches
  • Aurora: 6.9 inches
  • Bennett: 5.8 inches
  • Bergen Park: 7 inches
  • Breckenridge: 11.7 inches
  • Brookvale: 6 inches
  • Broomfield: 5.5 inches
  • Brush: 3.5 inches
  • Boulder: 7.1 inches
  • Castle Pines: 6.2 inches
  • Castle Rock: 3 inches
  • Centennial: 7 inches
  • Coal Creek Canyon: 17.2 inches
  • Conifer: 15 inches
  • Dacono: 4.6 inches
  • Denver: 6 inches
  • Denver International Airport: 5.7 inches
  • Echo Lake: 8 inches
  • Eldorado Springs: 14 inches
  • Elizabeth: 7.5 inches
  • Englewood: 4 inches
  • Erie: 5.5 inches
  • Estes Park: 5 inches
  • Evergreen: 6.5 inches
  • Federal Heights: 7.5 inches
  • Fort Collins: 4 inches
  • Frederick: 4.6 inches
  • Genesee: 11.5 inches
  • Georgetown: 8.2 inches
  • Golden: 8.8 inches
  • Greeley: 3.5 inches
  • Greenwood Village: 7 inches
  • Idledale: 10.5 inches
  • Jamestown: 3.6 inches
  • Lafayette: 4.5 inches
  • Lakewood: 6.5 inches
  • Laporte: 3 inches
  • Littleton: 4 inches
  • Longmont: 3.5 inches
  • Louisville: 6.1 inches
  • Loveland: 4 inches
  • Lyons: 2.8 inches
  • Nederland: 8.5 inches
  • Niwot: 6 inches
  • Northglenn: 5.8 inches
  • Parker: 2.8 inches
  • Pinecliffe: 17.2 inches
  • Sheridan: 2.5 inches
  • Silverthorne: 5.7 inches
  • Strasburg: 2 inches
  • Westminster: 6.5 inches
  • Wheat Ridge: 6 inches
  • Yuma: 7 inches